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10 Poems Chosen by the Sufi Poet Jalaluddin Rumi

Who is Jalaluddin Rumi? - For all my friends who like poetry or Islamic poetry, of course, you are familiar with this one character. he isMaulana Jalaluddin Rumiwho is famous as a famous Sufi figure in his time. On this occasion the Admin will give a brief biography of Maulana Jalaluddin Rumi.

Maulana Jalaluddin Rumi has the full name Maulana Jalaluddin Rumi Muhammad bin Hasin al Khattabi al-Bakri (Jalaluddin Rumi) or often referred to as Rumi is a Sufi poet who was born in Balkh (now Afghanistan) on the 6th of Rabiul Awwal in 604 Hijri, or September 30, 1207 AD. His father was still a descendant of Abu Bakr, named Bahauddin Walad. His mother is from the Khwarazm royal family.

Rumi's father was a pious scholar, he was foresight, a well-known teacher in Balkh. When Rumi was 3 years old because he was threatened by the Mogol invasion, his family left Balkh via Khorasan and Syria, to the province of Rum in central Anatolia, which is part of today's Turkey. They settled in Qonya, the capital of the province of Rum.

In 1244 AD, Rumi met another spiritual sheikh, Syamsuddin of Tabriz, who turned him into a perfectionist in Sufism. After Syamsuddi's death, Rumi met Husamuddin Ghalabi, and inspired him to write about his spiritual experiences in his monumental Matsnawi-ye Ma'nawi. He dictated his work to Husamuddin until the end of his life in 1273 AD.

Jalaluddin Rumi's Sufism and poetry began when he was quite old, 48 years old. Previously, Jalaluddin Rumi was a cleric who led a madrasa with 4,000 students. Like a scholar, he also gives fatwas and support for his people to ask questions and complain. His life changed one hundred and eighty degrees when he met a wandering Sufi, Syamsuddin alias Syamsi Tabriz.

Jalaluddin Rumi has become a Sufi, thanks to his association with Tabriz. His sadness of separation and his longing to see his teacher again have contributed to developing his emotions, so that he became a poet that is difficult to match. In order to remember and praise his teacher, he wrote poems, the collection of which became known as Divan-i Shams-i Tabriz. He also wrote his teacher's discourses, and the book was known as Maqalat-i Shams Tabriz.

Jalaluddin Rumi then got a new friend and source of inspiration, Sheikh Hisamuddin Hasan bin Muhammad. At the instigation of his friend, he succeeded during the last 15 years of his life to produce a large and amazing collection of poems which he named Masnavi-i. The book consists of six volumes and contains 20,700 stanzas of poetry. In this work, it can be seen the profound teachings of Sufism, which are conveyed in the form of apologies, fables, legends, anecdotes, and others. His other writings are Ruba'iyyat (a four-line poem in 1600 stanzas), Fiihi Maa fiihi (in prose; a collection of his lectures on Sufism), and Maktubat (a collection of his letters to friends or followers).

Together with Sheikh Hisamuddin, Jalaluddin Rumi also developed the Maulawiyah or Jalaliyah order. This Order in the West is known as The Whirling Dervishes. The name arose because the followers of this tarekat perform a circular dance, accompanied by drums and flutes, in their dhikr to achieve ecstasy.

Below are 10 selected poems from Jalaludin Rumi that you can listen to and understand their meaning. Happy listening.




only you

Of all the universe,
only You I choose,
Will you let me sit sad?

My heart is like a pen,
in the palm of your hand.

You are the cause of my joy,
or sad.

Unless you will,
what do i have?

Except what You show,
what do i see?

You are the one who grows me:
when I was a thorn,

when I am a rose;
when I smell like roses,
when my thorns are pulled out.

If you set me so,
then that's me.

If you want me like this,
then this is how i am.

in the vehicle,
where you color my soul,
Who am I?
what do i like?
what do i hate?

You are the First, and may You
will be the End;
make my ending better,
than my start.

When you are hidden,
I am a kufr;
When you appear,
I'm a believer.

I have nothing,
except that which Thou hast bestowed;
What are you looking for,
from my heart and my vessel?

Rumi, Divan Syamsi Tabriz no 30. Translation into English by Nicholson.


Blow from the Sky

When a blow from
Heaven hits you,
get ready,
because after that you
will receive a gift of respect.

Because it is impossible for the King
to slap you, without giving you a crown
and a throne to occupy.

The entire world-world is only worth
one wing of a flea, but
one slap can give you
immeasurable reward.

Quickly untie your
neck from the gold chain,
namely this world, and
receive a slap from the Lord.

The prophets have received
such blows on their necks,
hence, their heads held high.

Therefore, O seeker,
prepare yourselves,
always attentive:
present yourselves, so that
He may find you in your place.

If not,
He will take back
the prize of honor,
while saying,
"I can't find anyone here."

Rumi, Matsnavi VI: 1638 – 1643 Translation into English by Nicholson. Also translated by Camille and Kabir Helminski, in Rumi: Jewels of Remembrance, Threshold Books, 1996, Persian source translated by Yahya Monastra.


follow

Follow people who don't ask for anything in return. Those who don't want to get richer, or are afraid of losing. Who is not the least bit interested, even to maintain his image: he is a free man.

(Rumi: Rubaiyat, F#116) Translator: Zara Houshmand, ngrumi


You are the Way of Love

You are the Way of Love, and over there is my house.

You are one of the figures in the crowd but you are the only one who wears the crown.

I see You in the stars, in the sun, in the moon.

Also here in the green meadow, and on the other side, on the throne.

(Rumi, Rubaiyat F#1369) Translator: Zara Houshmand, ngrumi


O very gentle

O very Gentle, who sows the seeds of loyalty.

And rained down pure goodness upon this black earth:
Of course you understand my situation, wherever I am.

Don't you ever separate me from my love.

(Rumi: Rubaiyat, F#566) Translator: Zara Housmand, ngrumi


Reason Try Lecture

Go forth with reason, try to lecture the lovers.

Like robbers, ambush in the middle of the road.

But soon he realized, there is no place for logic in the minds of lovers.

So he bowed respectfully, and quickly walked away from them.


(Rumi: Rubaiyat, F#367) Translated into English by Zara Houshmand Translated into Indonesian by ngrumi.


Not a Poet

I'm not a poet, I don't make a living,

From there, or I show off my skills, I don't even think about

My art, this talent of mine is just a cup,

Which I will not gulp, unless my Beloved serves.


(Rumi: Rubaiyat, F#1256) Translator to English by Zara Houshmand Translator to Indonesian by ngrumi.


The Moans of the Prisoner of the World

How much longer must I find myself chained in this prison, chained to this world.

The time has come for me to reach the authenticity of life; and I move, gallop, toward purity.

If I can be purified, and cleansed from dirt, then there is nothing I seek except Him alone.

When I was created, the universe and palace were prepared for me; 1 I really refuse if I accept the position only as a doorman. 2

If I succeed in changing the attitude of this doorman, if I succeed in returning my mind to its true nature, happiness will come to replace my sadness.

O qalb: remember this is about the two of us alone, about the news that came to you in the middle of the night: I will follow the message, as you understand.

If later my wings have grown back to replace my sluggish legs, I will pass all obstacles: again I will fly, I will penetrate space and time.

Notes: 1 Anything provided for pious people. 2 The gatekeeper, that is to say, the master of the world, is imprisoned into this world; did not understand where the things he encountered in this world came from, and then where they went after leaving him.

Rumi: Divan-i Shamsi Tabriz, ghazal 1391 Translation into English by Nader Khalili, in Rumi: Fountain of Fire, Cal-Earth Press, 1994.


Planting Barley, Hoping for Wheat

You do bad things but expect good rewards.

Bad deeds deserve to be rewarded with bad recompense.

The Lord is merciful and very kind, but even so

If you plant barley, no wheat will grow.

(Rumi: Rubaiyat, F#1798) Translator to English by Zara Houshmand Translator to Indonesian by ngrumi.


If without you

Life without You is a violation.

Without You, what kind of life would I live?


O Light of my life, every life that passes,

Without You, it means death; That's the meaning of life for me.

(Rumi: Rubaiyat, F#1397) Translator to English by Zara Houshmand Translator to Indonesian by ngrumi.